Community Prevention Trials

Description of Strategy

Community Trials Intervention to Reduce High-Risk Drinking, also called Community Prevention Trials, is a multi-component, community-based program developed to alter the alcohol use patterns and related problems of people of all ages. The program incorporates a set of environmental interventions that assist communities in (1) using zoning and municipal regulations to restrict alcohol access through alcohol outlet density control; (2) enhancing responsible beverage service by training, testing, and assisting beverage servers and retailers in the development of policies and procedures to reduce intoxication and driving after drinking; (3) increasing law enforcement and sobriety checkpoints to raise actual and perceived risk of arrest for driving after drinking; (4) reducing youth access to alcohol by training alcohol retailers to avoid selling to minors and those who provide alcohol to minors; and (5) forming the coalitions needed to implement and support the interventions that address each of these prevention components. The program aims to help communities reduce alcohol-related accidents and incidents of violence and the injuries that result from them. The program typically is implemented over several years, gradually phasing in various environmental strategies; however, the period of implementation may vary depending on local conditions and goals (National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices, 2012).

Also known as...

Community trails to reduce high-risk drinking

Discussion of Effectiveness

Alcohol

Evidence suggests implementation of the Community Prevention Trials program can significantly reduce alcohol-related behaviors and harms (National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices, 2012). A study evaluating a similar program implemented on college campuses also found the program to significantly reduce high-risk drinking and its related consequences among college students (Wolfson et al., 2012).

References

Strategy Description

National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. (2012). Community Trials Intervention to Reduce High-Risk Drinking. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved July 30, 2012

Evidence Base

Holder, H. D. (2001). Community prevention trials: A respectful partnership. American Journal of Health Behavior, 25(3), 234–244.

Holder, H. D., Saltz, R. F., Grube, J. W., Treno, A. J., Reynolds, R. I., Voas, R. B., & Gruenewald, P. J. (1997). Summing up: Lessons from a comprehensive community prevention trial. Addiction, 92(6s1), 293–302. doi:10.1046/j.1360-0443.92.6s1.11.x

National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. (2012). Community Trials Intervention to Reduce High-Risk Drinking. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Treno, A. J., Gruenewald, P. J., Lee, J. P., & Remer, L. G. (2007). The Sacramento Neighborhood Alcohol Prevention Project: Outcomes from a community prevention trial. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 68(2), 197.

Wolfson, M., Champion, H., McCoy, T. P., Rhodes, S. D., Ip, E. H., Blocker, J. N., … DuRant, R. H. (2012). Impact of a randomized campus/community trial to prevent high-risk drinking among college students. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 36(10), 1767-78 doi:10.1111/j.1530-0277.2012.01786.x

Futher Reading

Roussos, S. T., & Fawcett, S. B. (2000). A review of collaborative partnerships as a strategy for improving community health. Annual Review of Public Health, 21(1), 369–402. doi:10.1146/annurev.publhealth.21.1.369